Wicked Winterfrost

Is That Mutton? No, Thanks.

Posted in Mongolia by talikas on June 24, 2009

jaanituli

Since our arrival in UB, various things have happened. We have been meeting so many people and their families, alternatively to Mongolian country pop we are now listening to techno-minimal-house (Mari&Juliette are officially in the UB techno gang now, how weird is that), visiting homes and country houses (Mongolian hospitality!), eating too much meat (horse meat, lamb tail, mutton mutton mutton), partying, sightseeing, shopping, cooking Mongolian/French/Estonian, getting to know the Mongolian mentality and way of thinking (“We’ll see…”), chilling, visited the Mongolian Krishna-temple-ger, etc. I even met another (crazy Uhhuuduur) Estonian (!) and had drinks with European Commission officials (sic!). So we’ve been quite busy and finally there’s internet :)

Yesterday we were celebrating St John’s day (Jaanip2ev) with locals. For Mongolians it was weird to go out of the city and make a real fire (not much wood lying around here) and I found it hillarious being suddenly in a huge 4×4 jeep with 4 serious Chingis Khan-looking men, driving around in complete darkness (again with techno music) and trying to find a good spot for our little bonfire. My modest explanations about the shortest night, glowing worms and mysterious flowers were ignored and instead, young Mongolians started to wrestle (kind of their national sport). They did, however, fancy jumping over the fire and were excited about almost burning their clothes…

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What’s Your Name? Sorry? What? What?! Jhkghgh what?? – Ok, Call Me John

Posted in Mongolia by talikas on June 24, 2009

huntushe_jul

vanatallinn

And then it happened. Our perfect trip in the middle of nowhere had ended and we suddenly found ourselves back in Ulanbaatar. Our eyes were still used to the emptiness, greenery, mountains, horses… But kaboom! All of a sudden we are surrounded by heavy traffic,  noise, polluted air, buildings (!!!), too many people and too much information. The only familiar thing was the condition of the roads :)

So when Juliette and I met a friend-of-a-friend, a young handsome Mongolian Huntushe (thanks Kaspar!), we were still a bit shocked about the huge contrast between the countryside and the city. Huntushe took our bags and showed us the way to a great apartment in the centre of the city. Already seeing a shower (with hot water!) and a real bed made us jump with joy. But it was difficult to enter this new reality… A moment later we were in a car with young trendy Mongolians, driving around the dark capital, flashing lights around us, and listening to Norwegian techo, and it just felt too absurd. I was happy Juliette was in the same dream as me.

The until 5 AM “Lost in Translation” private techno party in a random hotel bar with super cool and well-dressed Mongolian elite didn’t help (my dirty pants were still smelling like camel sweat)…